Your Bourbon ‘Thrilla in Manila’ with a Touch of Vanilla..

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Live Action Quick Tips

Did you know….

Michael Veach is Louisville’s unofficial bourbon ambassador.If there’s just one thing I take away from my conversation with Louisville, Kentucky, historian Michael Veach, it’s that there is no wrong way to drink bourbon. Dilute it with water, mix it with ginger ale, or stir in a liqueur or two and call it something fancy like “The Revolver.” According to Veach, makers of America’s native spirit are just as pleased to see their product served up with a maraschino cherry as they are watching it poured straight into a shot glass. And you know? I believe him. Because when it comes to all things bourbon, Veach is Louisville’s go-to source.

Filson Historical Society is home to bourbon labels printed as early as the 1850s, he says, “the story that the name ‘bourbon’ comes from Bourbon County doesn’t even start appearing in print until the 1870s.” Instead, Veach believes the name evolved in New Orleans after two men known as the Tarascon brothers arrived to Louisville from south of Cognac, France, and began shipping local whiskey down the Ohio River to Louisiana’s bustling port city. “They knew that if Kentuckians put their whiskey into charred barrels they could sell it to New Orleans’ residents, who would like it because it tastes more like cognac or ‘French brandy’,” says Veach.

In the 19th century, New Orleans entertainment district was Bourbon Street, as it is today. “People starting asking for ‘that whiskey they sell on Bourbon Street,’” he says, “which eventually became ‘that bourbon whiskey.’” Still, Veach concedes, “We may never know who actually invented bourbon, or even who the first Kentucky distiller was.”(smithsonianmag.com)

Today’s Drink

Tailgate Sipper

Average Cost

$40 to buy all ingredients, about $10 per drink at a bar

Rating (1-10)

10

Recommended Events: 

Best during the summer or a gathering with friends/family. A definite party drink

Recipe found at Southern Living

Not everyone loves Bourbon, but I surely do.

The drink mixes usually have a sweet embrace to them and work great with sugar on the brim.

From Manhattan’s to Derby’s to Old Fashion’s; I just can’t get enough.

This drink that Southern Living calls the Tailgate Sipper is one of those drinks that will make you the hit of the party.

The recipe consists of:

4 cups cubed fresh pineapple

1 cup bourbon

1 cup chilled lemon sparkling water (such as Perrier)

1/2 cup Southern Comfort

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

If you are looking at the vanilla extract and saying to yourself, “What?! Vanilla Extract?! How? When? Why?”

Yes, my simple bourbon sipping friend. This drink is filled with exotic ingredients to make it pack a super punch at your next gathering.

I made it home to test it out and let me say that I have tasted nothing like it at a bar.

It was so refreshing and light enough that everyone could enjoy it, including the light drinkers.

It also packed a punch with alcohol in it so that the heavy drinkers would be graceful and ecstatic from their flourishing buzz.

Pineapple and vanilla touch your palate, with the sweet twinge from the Southern Comfort and then a slight jab from the Bourbon.

Tastes so good you just want to swish it around your mouth, and I guarantee after your first drink you will feel pretty sensational as you dance around with a soothing bourbon buzz.

Definitely something you should try if you are looking for the next refreshing drink in your life. True live action living! Thanks for the recipe Southern Living!

Thanks for joining me on today’s adventure! I look forward to seeing you on the next run!

Eating is an enjoyable way of life.Live it..Learn it..Love it!

Trevis Dampier Sr.

References

 Laura Kiniry (JUNE 13, 2013) Where Bourbon Really Got Its Name and More Tips on America’s Native Spirit Retrieved from http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/where-bourbon-really-got-its-name-and-more-tips-on-americas-native-spirit-145879/?no-ist

 

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